Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Get yourself a Busse INFI Dog Soldier knife



If you’re looking for some INFI steel knife from Busse they have a pretty neat knife available at the moment for $259.95 called the INFI Dog Soldier.

INFI knives are usually around the 350ish to 500 buck range so the $259 price, while high, isnt that bad. Especially given that these days any 1095 "survival"  knife costs around or above 100 bucks. Good stainless steel knives often twice as much.
Busse knives are often sold out in a matter of days and resold at higher prices.In particular INFI steel blades tend to be pretty expensive as you probably know, so while the price isnt cheap, you do get something neat in the knife world, but also a steel that is actually excellent. and you get to pick the blade color finish.

No, I don’t make a single buck out of this, no commission of any kind, but I do write about these knives at times and they aren’t always easy to acquire so this is your chance if you want a high end blade. Here's the link.
http://www.bussecombat.com/infi-dog-soldier/
The current offer is the Dog Soldier, 6.25 inch blade, .210" thick. A solid blade geometry, great Respirine C grip. The only thing I’d like to have is a matte or satin polished finish but I can live with the black finish too, especially at that price.
Get one while you can if interested, supply tends to be limited. In fact I’m posting this because I already ordered mine, which I will review once I receive it.
Take care!
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Concealed Carry: When 47 rounds is not Enough



This is a great story, explaining why this cop went from carrying 47 rounds of 45ACP to 145 rounds of 9mm. It just goes to show with a real-world incident why you probably need to carry more ammo and why that 5-shot sunbnose, while sure better than nothing, may still not be enough.

Why one cop carries 145 rounds of ammo on the job

Sergeant Timothy Gramins went from 45 ACP to 9mm (sacriledge! Right? Well, no) after 14 hits on a lone attacker with his .45 Glock 21, of which six should have been show stoppers (heart, right lung, left lung, liver, diaphragm, and right kidney) failed to stop his assailant. And attacker that was not under the influence of narcotics but just very determined to kill him.
He went from a Glock 21 to Glock 17 (Glock 26 as backup). Three spare 17-round  mags and a couple 33-round mags on his vest.
I would have gone with a tad less ammo and more power per round with a Glock 31 in 357SIG, but that’s just me. ;-)
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Seal Team Six E&E kit: cash, Copenhagen and cigarettes





Sure they have some great gear, and small survival tin kits with a lot of useful tools (and of course the training to go along with it) but I think it’s interesting that Robert O'Neill mentions CASH as the first thing that comes to mind if he ever has to make his way home on his own after a mission. What does he do when he gets a call right before getting in a plane to go God knows where? Hit the ATM for as much cash as he can and buys some tobacco.


“I know I’m going to jump somewhere but I don’t know where I’m going to end up. And I can buy my way home with money, or somewhere else I can barter with tobacco…plus I love tobacco”.


Folks that have never been to 3rd world countries just don’t understand the power of a 20, 50, let alone 100 USD bill. With absurd conversion rates in most of the third world, a 50 dollar bill is in parts of the world more money than the average person there will see in the same place in his entire life. You can buy shelter, food, you can buy transportation or even loyalty. 

Cash is king indeed.

FerFAL

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Is Bitcoin the new gold?


I’ve always avoided giving financial advice. Not my job and just too much responsibility.
When it comes to such a thing, I just stick to what I know well which is economic collapse. It’s what I went through and it’s what I’ve researched over the years.

When it comes to an economic collapse there are a few basic points to keep in mind.
When everything is going to hell, you can count on banks screwing you to save themselves. Closed doors and a “Me speako no English” sign on it… in New York City. Frozen accounts, conversion to new currencies worth a fraction of what the original one was worth.

Precious metals provide a hedge against hyperinflation or full economic collapse. They are an established commodity over thousands of years, accepted as something that holds intrinsic value. IT doesn’t matter if it’s just a chunk of metal. In our minds, and now for thousands of years, “its worth its weight in gold”. And oil is worth its weight in oil, so are cereals, beans and so on.
And then there’s bitcoin. A complex cryptocurrency which most people don’t even fully understand what it is. The only way to understand more is to spend several hours, maybe several days reading up. What’s important to understand is that Bitcoin is a commodity. The best way to describe it would be the digital gold of the internet era.

No, its not gold, nor is it silver. The piece silver in my pocket, a 1964 Kennedy half dollar, is material, tangible, but that doesn’t mean Bitcoin isn’t valuable as well. What it lacks in tangible peace of mind it has in liquidity. Its easy to move around, access and sell all over the world. Its not controlled by anyone, no government. For Bitcoin you'll need a Bitcoin wallet. Which one?  I'm not affiliated in any way to any of them and cant recommend a specific one. Just look online and go for the one with the best reputation.

When asked for financial advice I’ve always kept a pretty conservative position. Diversify, some cash is important, very important actually. Some money in the bank, some money in a bank in a different country, some precious metals, investing in reliable stocks, investing in good real estate. And yes, putting some money in Bitcoin.

Bitcoin has been going up non stop this year. Will it stop and drop? Probably. Will it go up even more in the long run, maybe a LOT more? I think that’s very likely. While its digital nature means there’s always the risk of hacking or other tech related problems, its ability to be moved around, the market for it, easily converted to different currencies and increased acceptance are advantages worth noticing.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Friday, August 4, 2017

Trump’s right: Adaptability is Key


I was reading the news today and read something President Trump said about people not moving to where jobs are available.
Trump is right about this: Americans need to move where the jobs are
August 3 at 3:57 PM
Vehicles sit in rush hour traffic at the interchange between the Interstate 405 and 10 freeways in this aerial photograph taken over Los Angeles, California. (Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg).
President Trump said something last week that deserves a lot more attention. Americans “are going to have to start moving,” Trump said in his interview with The Wall Street Journal (Politico leaked the full transcript of the exchange this week).
He’s right.
Americans aren’t packing up and moving as they used to. Mobility is at an all-time low, according to the Census Bureau, which has tracked how many Americans change addresses since World War II. About 10 percent of Americans moved in the past year, the Census Bureau found. That’s way down from the 1950s, '60s, '70s and early '80s, when more than 20 percent of the nation was on the go.
(continue reading https://www.washingtonpost.com/....)
 /
Making ends meet is a key factor when it comes to finances, a rather important aspect of preparedness. I read all the time about people not finding jobs, or not finding good ones or jobs that pay well. Well… sometimes there aren’t any around and you need to move.
Especially in smaller communities this can be an issue, even more so if the specific town or general area is going through a depression.
In general people don’t like moving. It’s a very natural instinct to feel safe in the environment you know and avoid changes but sometimes they are necessary. It’s also true that once you do it a couple times it gets easier and moving when needed or when you feel like it isn’t scary any more. Like with everything else in life, we adapt, we get used to it. And when you get used to adapting to new places, new people and new surroundings you don’t stress over doing it again if you have to.
Now I’m not saying move around all the time. Sometimes though, it is worth the effort, especially if the economic stability will allow greater peace of mind, security and overall a better quality of life in general.
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Advantages of Plasma/Tesla Coil Lighters?